Lunge Feeding. Image: Fiona Fogarty.
Lunge Feeding. Image: Fiona Fogarty.

In October, we tend to see a lot of Humpbacks in the area as they make their way past the Island toward warmer waters in places like Mexico and Hawaii. While we have every chance of seeing these whales on our Whale Watching tours, we rarely encounter as many as we did this morning. In the three-hour tour we managed to track down twelve (yes, 12!) Humpbacks.  It almost seemed as if the whales were out to find Marauder IV, as the boat was able to spot several groups (of two to three animals) in a relatively small area west of Salmon Bank.  For the most part the whales were feeding, with a few of them staying close to the surface of the water and showing off their massive tails.

In the afternoon Capitan Ian also had a successful trip, tracking down a group of Transient Killer Whales just south of Race Rocks. Our passengers enjoyed a nice long encounter with the whales, including some half-breaches, spy hops and lots of rolling around at the surface of the water. When learning that the afternoon Zodiac had come across Transient Killer Whales, Captain Bill, who captained the morning tour, he said he was not at all surprised, as the seals and sea lions that he saw a Race Rocks were extremely skittish and looked very nervous!

Captain Ian then made his way out the same area that the Humpbacks had been seen in the morning and sure enough they were still around, this time lunge feeding! For those of you who haven’t been lucky enough to see a Humpback lunge feeding, we’ve included a photo to show you just how big their mouths can open!

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